[ in time time ]

Commissioned Installation/Solo New Media exhibition composed of 4 works: an interactive & responsive video using physical computing, a split-screen video, 8 large-scale and 8 small-scale works on paper.

Tarble Arts Center - eGallery
Eastern Illinois University
Charleston, USA

January 18 - February 24, 2008

The work was created in collaboration with Osvaldo Rosato, my father (RIP 2007). Production Assistance by Nogginaut Interactive Experience Design in Physical Space. A publication with an essay and color reproductions accompanies the exhibition.

Tarble Art Center, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, USA.
[in time time], eGallery, Tarble Art Center, 2008, installation view displaying three works: ping-pong-ow (front), 8-bits storyboards (left side wall), and 8-bits split-screen video (right). Production Assistance for ping-pong-ow: Nogginaut (Interactive Experience Design in Physical Space).
[in time time], eGallery, Tarble Art Center, 2008, installation view displaying 4 visitors interacting with ping-pong ow, an interactive video projection that responded to visitors’ gestures. Production Assistance for ping-pong-ow: Nogginaut (Interactive Experience Design in Physical Space).
[in time time], eGallery, Tarble Art Center, 2008, installation view displaying (left) several visitors interacting with ping-pong ow, an interactive video projection; and (right) visitors reading texts in the series of 8 large-scale prints titled: 8-bits storyboards.
[in time time], eGallery, Tarble Art Center, 2008, installation view displaying (left) my father’s sketches included in the documentary video, and (left) the 8-minute split screen documentary video. The 4 images below are stills extracted from the video.
 
 
 

Read Pat Badani’s text: http://www.patbadani.net/in_time_time_text2.html

Catalogue Essay by Dr. Martin Patrick
Read full essay at: http://www.patbadani.net/in_time_time_text1.html

Throughout her recent works Pat Badani has enacted and exhibited an eclectic history of inltration, a trait that goes along extremely well with the mode of operations that a mixed-genre or interdisciplinary practice necessarily entails. Badani’s complex works most often explore not what already exists, but what might yet occur. This approach has resulted in a substantial group of open-ended works with indeterminate outcomes stemming from highly detailed and orchestrated "set-ups." By using the term inltration I intend to emphasize the manner in which the artist has relocated her artistic practice into various non-art settings, and equivalently aspects of the outside - non-art-world - that continually make inroads into Badani’s context-specic works.

Projects initiated since the late 1990s have been characterized by the integration of digital media and environments. Moreover whether her work is seen in a public setting, virtual site, or more conventional art gallery, Badani seeks to downplay such distinctions in favor of creating, in her words, a “communicational space.” Such a space, insofar as it fosters dialogue, then becomes far more evocative and incorporative of the problematic art-life questions of the current moment than a more traditional mode of practice.

This participatory approach has included such interdisciplinary specialists as physicians or architects along with the audience/viewers, but perhaps just as importantly the artist herself, as when Badani worked alongside bakers in one of the most prestigious of Paris bakeries to achieve her works Tower-Tour, Urban Projects (both 1997), Cultures and Ferments (1999), Home Transfer (2000), and Where Life is Better (2003). She continued to work with the public-at-large in six international cities for her award-winning project Where are you from?_Stories (2002-06), and in the case of Me&U2 (2005), integrated physical computing. The resulting projects were manifested in multiple forms: sculptural installation, large-scale documentary plates, videos and web-oriented works. One testament to Badani’s thoroughly interdisciplinary approach is the fact that her work has been recorded in—and thus infiltrated—such radically disparate venues as a glossy book documenting the history of bread-making and the Poilane bakery, as well as the most competitive of international digital art and video festivals. (Continued reading @: --http://www.patbadani.net/in_time_time_text1.html)